Wild horse overpopulation is fake news

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Brutal experiments continue on pregnant wild horses!

Did you know that right now the Bureau of Land Management, under the Department of Interior is still funding cruel experiments on wild pregnant mares for population control?

Keep in mind that the National Academy of Sciences Report from 2013 stated there is “no evidence” of overpopulation. It’s the end of 2016 and there is still no evidence of alleged overpopulation and the thugs in control won’t do a headcount. They just want to keep abusing innocent wild horses and burros who should be living in freedom. Sickos!

The brutal tubal ligation research on pregnant wild mares in Oregon was stopped due to public outrage but that’s it. All the other tax-payer funded experiments on pregnant wild mares continue. They are cruelly experimenting on them now! Did you realize that?

The Department of Interior is giving away grants totaling up to 11 million dollars for population control experiments–on pregnant wild mares. Are these experiments causing pain and suffering and do they violate the rights of wild horses and burros to live free? Yes. This a wicked violation against their freedom.

So while everyone was distracted by real threats of killing and slaughtering wild horses, the brutal Nazi-like experiments–mostly with injections–continue . . .

America’s last wild horses should never be used as “lab animals”. Never. How is this even legal to experiment on federally protected wild horses?

Wild horses have been cruelly subjected to experimentation for decades. This cruelty has been going on for so long that the Bureau of Land Management and their supporters think this is “normal”. Experimentation on federally protected wild horses must be against the law but there is so much corruption within wild horse and animal advocacy that no one is stopping this! Those organizations who support using Pesticide PZP as birth control will not fight against experimenting on wild horses because they are still involved with PZP experiments or receive funding from those that are.

2017 is the time to fight back the evil cruelty inflicted upon America’s innocent and voiceless wild horses and burros! They should be protected from experimentation, protected from being sold to slaughter, protected from being killed and protected to live freely in the wild.

We’d like to protect wild horses from this abuse. Will you join us?

 

For the Wild Ones,

Anne Novak

Volunteer Executive Director

www.ProtectMustangs.org

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




Email to save special needs wild horses from being killed

PM Oct 2014 PVC Mirror

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: Pulling Special Needs Wild Horses From Holding and The Adoption

Program and Killing Them

From: <@protectmustangs.org>

Date: Thu, November 10, 2016 12:05 pm

To: tgorey@blm.gov

Dear Mr. Gorey,

Is it true that the Bureau of Land Management (BoLM) and/or the Department of Interior is pulling or plans to pull wild horses from the adoption program and holding facilities to kill them if they have any sort of special needs such as club feet or other alleged defects? Who gave the order to do this?

We officially request the following:

  1. Take and post photos on the internet. 3 photos of each wild horse and/or burro you intend to kill. One of their face, one of their full body and one of their alleged defect.
  2. Offer all special needs wild horses up for adoption for a reduced fee on the internet as an incentive before killing them. They have already lost their freedom and families. Give the public a chance to save them. 
  3. Provide transportation to the adopters facility if they adopt 2-4 special needs wild horses. 

How many have you already killed?

We also request you take a photo of how you are disposing of their dead bodies after the Bureau of Land Management, their contractors or others have killed them. Are you burying them in pits at the holding facilities?

I pray that the Bureau of Land Management will offer these wild horses to compassionate people who want to save their lives or to sanctuaries instead of killing them. They have made it this far. Just because they aren’t perfect doesn’t mean they should be killed. After all, you have already destroyed their natural lives by rounding them up with helicopters, ripping apart their families, destroying their ecological niche and subjecting them to lonely lives in captive feedlot settings or long term holding ranches at taxpayer expense.

We are awaiting your response.

Sincerely,

Anne Novak

Executive Director

Protect Mustangs

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




Help get wild horses to safety!

Now that the election is over let’s get America’s at-risk wild horses out of holding facilities to safety! Don’t forget the Bureau of Land Management’s Advisory Board voted to kill all the wild horses in holding facilities. They are all at risk of losing their lives.

Please Help SARA (#1709) Get To Safety! 

She was passed over in the Internet Adoption and has another STRIKE against her

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SARA (#1709) seems to be a very bright yearling filly who needs to get out of the clutches of the Bureau of Land Management! She will respond well to leadership, respect and love once she knows she can trust you. She is growing. She seems to be very intelligent– holding ancient herd wisdom lost with so many wild horses being slaughtered. But with that comes an eye that will watch to see if she can trust you. Show her pure love and patience so SARA can shine. Adopt her with a buddy so she will feel safe and less stressed as she is gentled and learns to trust you. Take it slow with her. SARA seems to be the kind of wild mustang who will love you forever.

Adoption is $125 and 3-Strikers for purchase cost $25

This is what the Bureau of Land Management says about SARA:

Sex: Filly Age: 1 Years Height (in hands): 13.1

Necktag #: 1709 Date Captured: 04/01/15

Freezemark: 15621709 Signalment Key: HF1AAEDIE

Color: Sorrel Captured: Born in a Holding Facility

Notes:
1709 IS A YEARLING BORN AT A FACILITY
This wild horse is currently located in Fallon, NV. For more information, please contact Jeb Beck at (775) 475-2222 or e-mail: j1beck@blm.gov

More wild horses at-risk will be posted soon!

Please share this post to help 3-Strikers and those close to 3-Strikes get to safe homes, sanctuaries and trainers. It’s much cheaper to adopt and or buy them now than later from a kill pen for seven times the price.

Contact us by email at Contact@ProtectMustangs.org if you need help navigating the Bureau of Land Management’s red tape or get discouraged. Problems can be solved so you can save wild horses. Our goal is to support you to make your adoption or 3-Strike purchase a happy experience.

Check back on this page daily as we will be updating this page with mustangs who need to be saved. Thank you and Bless you!

For the Wild Ones,
Anne Novak

Volunteer Executive Director
Protect Mustangs
P.O. Box 5661
Berkeley, CA. 94705
www.ProtectMustangs.org

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




Mustang holding facility open for rare public tour in Fallon October 28th

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Failed adoptions result in America’s wild horses and burros becoming at-risk of ending up at slaughter

RENO, Nev. —The Bureau of Land Management (BoLM) will host two free public tours of the Indian Lakes Off-Range Wild Horse and Burro Corral in Fallon, Nevada, on Friday, October 28. The private corral is one of three in Nevada that fattens up wild horses and burros removed from the range so they are attractive to kill buyers in the end. Tour attendees will have the opportunity to view native wild horses recently rounded up from public lands in central and eastern Nevada when the federal agency could have brought them water on the range to save taxpayer dollars. Instead they rounded them up, will offer them for adoption 3 times for $125 in order to “strike them out”. Then to dispose of them, the federal agency sells them off for $25 to horse traders who eventually flip them to kill buyers for slaughter.

“The Bureau claims they don’t sell wild horses to slaughter but they don’t seem do any post sales checks to make sure the mustangs aren’t sent to Mexico or Canada to be butchered for human consumption abroad,” explains Anne Novak, executive director or Protect Mustangs. “What about all the wild horses that aren’t accurately accounted for that aren’t sold yet? What happened to them?”

The rare public tours are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. and each will last about two hours. Each tour will accommodate up to 20 people. The public can sign up to attend and get driving directions to the facility by calling the BoLM at (775) 475-2222.

About a 90-minute drive east of Reno, the Indian Lakes Off-Range Corral is located at 5676 Indian Lakes Road, Fallon, and is privately owned and operated with a big money contract. Tour attendees will have limited access to the captives. They will be taken around the facility as a group on a wagon to learn about the facility, the wild horses and burros available for adoption, and BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program. These tours should be happening every weekend at least to encourage adoptions out of the Fallon facility.

The Indian Lakes corral can provide care for up to 3,200 wild horses or burros. The facility encompasses 320 acres containing 43 large holding pens, each pen measuring 70,000 square feet that will safely hold about 100 wild horses or burros. The wild horses receive a lot of feed to fatten them up, along with a constant supply of fresh water through automatic watering troughs. Free choice mineral block supplements are also provided to the wild horses and burros in each pen. A veterinarian routinely inspects the wild horses and burros and the BoLM claims they provide necessary veterinary care as needed.

The Bureau of Land Management is failing at adoptions because of lack of marketing and poor customer service.

“If the U.S. Congress only realized how hard it is to adopt wild horses and give them homes they might make the bureau change their ways,” says Novak.

For example the wild horses at the Indian Lakes facility with limited access to the public are almost impossible to adopt despite looking like they are available for adoption or sale at off-site adoption events and through BLM’s Internet Adoption program. Too many 3-Strikers are coming out of the Fallon facility so it’s proof their system is failing.

pm-investigate-count-fallon-list-meme-sept-2016-001

Sign and share the petition to investigate the head count of wild horses and burros: https://www.change.org/p/u-s-senate-investigate-the-wild-horse-burro-count-in-captivity-and-freedom

Keep in mind that the BoLM’s main focus is making money off public land the wild horses and burros are supposed to have for principle but not exclusive use. The BoLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BoLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BoLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands. They fail at environmental stewardship and are irresponsible towards all the wild horses and burros they removed to make billions in profit. In 20 years the BoLM will make more than 200 billion dollars as long as their planned #fracking boom moves forward.

Contact Protect Mustangs (Contact@ProtectMustangs.org) if you want to adopt a pair of wild horses and save their lives. We help adopters navigate the Bureau of Land Management’s red tape to get to success.

Protect Mustangs is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




2 special needs wild horses escape death at roundup

Day 2 of Devil's Garden Roundup courtesy Devils Garden Wild Horses FB Page

Day 2 of Devil’s Garden Roundup courtesy Devils Garden Wild Horses FB Page

Protect Mustangs will help find homes for 2 wild horses who would have been killed at Modoc Forest roundup

ALTURAS, Ca.(September 27, 2016)–Last week Anne Novak, founder and director of Protect Mustangs reached out to U.S. Forest Service staff with an offer to help find homes for any wild horses rounded up with pre-existing conditions–who would be killed–not offered a chance at adoption. Tonight Novak received the first call from Forest Service staff.

“It’s always bothered me that after wild horses heal from injuries and survive in the wild, they are chased by helicopters, rounded up and killed upon capture because they don’t seem like they would get adopted,” says Novak. “Some people don’t want a riding horse. Some people want to save a life.”

So far, two wild horses from the roundup have pre-existing conditions. One is believed to be pigeon toed due to a broken foot that healed in the wild. The other mustang’s condition is unknown at this time.

“They need to go to loving homes to become pets–not riding partners–or go to sanctuaries,” explains Novak. “They have survived in the wild and that’s a harsh life. They deserve our compassion after the roundup and they deserve to live.”

After the mustang protectors make an assessment of the wild horses with pre-existing conditions, a sanctuary might be a more suitable forever home. It’s too early to tell.

These two California wild horses from Modoc County will join their herd-mates at the Bureau of Land Management’s Litchfield holding Corrals near Susanville. There they will be prepared for adoption with the others.

Adoption applications are here: Protect-Mustangs-BLM-facility-adoption-app

    • Cost to adopt is $125.
    • Adoptions by appointment only, call (530) 254-6575.
    • Open Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Summer hours are 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. The facilities are closed on federal holidays. Please call for current information.
    • Information is available 24 hours a day by calling 1-800-545-4256.
    • Completed adoption applications can be sent to Videll Retterath by e-mail vrettera@blm.gov or fax (530)252-6762.
    • The Corrals are located 21 miles east of Susanville , CA on US Highway 395.
    • Adopters receive title to wild horses after one year

Protect Mustangs will post photos as soon as we get them. Tax-deductible Gas donations are always needed to help us help the wild ones.

pm-ufs-devils-garden

Photo by the US Forest Service

Members of the public with questions about the BLM’s requirements for adoption, questions about the wild horses with pre-existing conditions, who want to help network homes for wild horses who would be killed for pre-existing conditions, need trainer referrals, or want some tips on how to build an inexpensive shelter are invited to email the mustang protectors at Contact@ProtectMustangs.org

“I pray we can change the trend of killing special needs wild horses at roundups,” says Novak. ‘Someone’s going to fall in love with them. After all they’re still American mustangs.”

Protect Mustangs is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




Wild Horses Biodiversity and Ecological Zones — Wild Horses Benefit Our Lands

“What needs to stop, is the bad decisions based on what Bureau of Land Management personnel knows to be misinformation, and even out right lies!  These items so plentiful, and now coming from non-profits with conflicts of interest as well, and cannot be used to make further decisions upon and about the Wild Horses on our Public Lands. We need to demand truth!  And with the truth,, good science, good data, and those with the knowledge to understand the data and research statistics, only then can we make good reasonable decisions about the Wild Horses, and placing them back onto our Public Lands.  Time for the Special Interests and welfare ranchers to go, as they are all unnecessary as well as not needed there what so ever.”  — John Cox, The Cascades

When we discuss the Loss of biodiversity within Ecological Zones, we are discussing, with evidence we see first-hand combined with a thorough knowledge of history, a Reality. . . The 48% Overkill, or mass extinction of species, has become devastating – the reality becoming even worse within our wilderness environment. But less recognized is loss of biodiversity at the Ecological Zone or entire ecosystem level, which occurs when distinct habitats, species assemblages, and natural processes are diminished or degraded in quality.Federal Lands

America’s broken Wildlife Management System, based upon ignorance, fear, and obvious agenda-driven bad science, apparently assumes everything is okay in our wilds and with our wildlife – but it is not, and has not been for quite some time now . . . America is being invaded, not by another country, but that of mind-set = of blatant Ignorance and Illusory Perceptions of knowledge based on nothing more than ignorance or false premise.

Our Public Lands and other Federal Lands, currently, are experiencing the highest rates of species extinction in America’s history. However, biodiversity is being lost more widely than just on these lands. Habitats, such as freshwater-zones, desert and forested Public Lands, and old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest, to name but four, are being destroyed very aggressively, with much ignorance and from government agencies, with total destruction eminent much sooner than perceived previously.

With this in mind, we stand to lose a far greater proportion of species (lands incapable of supporting these species due to interference from human’s), inclusive of America’s Wild Horses as well, within areas designated as cattle grazing permit zones, or areas settled and exploited within other activities by humans – both (i.e. due to ignorance and lack of positive driven actions) the causation and not the cure. The loss of biodiversity at the ecosystem levels, i.e. Ecological Zones Levels, have been greatest there so far, extreme in devastation.

Inward Perspective of Ecological Zones

Ecosystems can be lost, or tragically compromised, in basically two ways. The most obvious kind of loss is quantitative–the conversion of a native prairie to a cattle grazing allotment situation on Public Lands or on Forestry Lands, or just as extreme, construction of buildings or to a parking lot or oil exploration, et al. Quantitative losses, in principle, can be measured easily by a decline in areal extent of a discrete ecosystem type (i.e., one that can be mapped).

The second kind of loss is qualitative and involves a change or degradation in the structure, function, or composition of an ecosystem. At some level of degradation, an ecosystem ceases to be natural. For example, a ponderosa pine (e.g. Pinus ponderosa within the Klamath Basin) forest may be compromised by removing the largest, healthiest, and frequently, the genetically superior trees; a sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe may be grazed so heavily that native perennial grasses are replaced by exotic annuals (becoming firestorm hazards); or a stream may become dominated by trophic generalist and exotic fishes (e.g. as cattle grazing those lands wreaked havoc with the indigenous species, which disappeared, and exotics simply invaded and took over, i.e. Murderer’s Creek for a good factual and data driven example).

Qualitative changes may be expressed quantitatively, for instance, by reporting that 99% of the sagebrush steppe is affected by livestock grazing, but such estimates are usually less precise than estimates of habitat conversion. In some cases, as in the conversion of an old-growth forest to a BLM grazing permit allotment, the qualitative changes in structure and function are sufficiently severe to qualify as outright habitat loss. Then the awkward question becomes, “How many of these habitat losses can we handle before the collapse of an entire Ecological System devastates the entire environmental complex?heavenly-pit

Frankly, within this modern age of information outlets, we have achieved several negative situations of a nature not so attractive, nor to take pride within, what so ever. Yes, ignorance and stupidity often questions good science, and moronic confusion follows. Often, ironically within this information age, political decisions, for example, sometimes based on outright lies, and the only credible situation that exists, well, no credibility what so ever for the decision at all.

In Oregon a Law was passed three years ago, that gives Rights to legislators to “Lie” about the facts and science in matters of passing Bills / Laws for the state. This year the wolves in the State of Oregon were Delisted from the Endangered Species List, due to falsification and lies about science, about the ESL itself, and lies in the matter of “facts-given” within the ratios of wolf-caused cattle attacks (less-kills by wolves a reality when compared to the facts given to other legislators on this subject material) – the cattle industry very questionable within integrity these days also, with no apparent credibility what so ever.

Ecological Zones and Destructive Invasive Situations

Conifer forests that are inner-dependent on circumstances from good management paradigms, e.g. fire suppression, notably ponderosa pine in the Cascade Mountain Range, have declined not only from logging, but also from invasion of non-indigenous animals, for example, by cattle and their obvious over-population. These kinds of change can cause the loss of a distinct Ecological Zone and entire ecosystem as surely as if the forest were clear-cut, which is also done for cattle – a very controversial situation indeed, but with BLM and Forestry, who remain overwhelmed with misinformation and lies and bad science, which is given to the public to cover-up the reality and destruction.

Ecological processes are also affected; widespread insect infestation and tree mortality east of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest is blamed largely on past fire suppression, mostly by government sources. Then we look at other realities, specifically, cattle and their over-population once again.

One of the best examples is the Sage Grouse (and the supposed inter-cooperative agreements between welfare ranchers on Public Lands and Forestry Lands and the Department of the Interior (with BLM as the management portion, or mismanagement as many speak of the program itself, quite obvious to most, and costing taxpayers millions but based upon a false premise) –

The Reality: cattle hooves stomp the grasses that the Sage Grouse live within for shelter and to hide form their natural enemies, as they are a food source for many wildlife species, and the reason why they are endangered. Soon the Sage Grouse unprotected – and cattle-presence also attracts crows, and crows favorite food source? Yup, Sage Grouse. BLM’s response? “Let’s kill all the Crows. Government incompetence? Or, government imposes special interest favors, special agendas due to lobby groups, upon taxpayer’s dollars, and toward welfare ranchers – all guided by misinformation and false premise to conduct the travesty, or, the destruction of more Ecological Zones? The facts do not lie – although, in this case especially (one of many more) government personnel and welfare ranchers do lie.

Invasion and Destruction of Ecological Zones / Saving them

So what is it, logically and knowledgably, we discuss in the matters of Ecological Zones or overall ecosystem decline. Through research we find that the most endangered ecosystems are typically at low elevations and have fertile soils, amiable climates, easy terrains, abundant natural resources, and other factors that encourage human settlement, but worse yet, exploitation.

The Great Plains, for example, and here in Oregon, is a vast sagebrush steppe of the Intermountain West that is in many areas overgrazed by cattle, with a very noticeable over-population of cattle present almost year around. Regional studies of ecosystem status should address the many potential causes of biotic impoverishment to devise effective conservation and restoration strategies – but when cattle involved, reality-conservation paradigms are not discussed at all within our current government management agencies. Why? History (sound research and data gathering as well) shows us that Buffalo did not migrate over large parts of the Great Basin way back when, due to the shelf-crust to thin, which also exists today. Mother Nature at work with the Buffalo, much wiser than our human species, obviously. So cattle roam, and are very destructive on the thin crust of lands within the basin areas.

The functional ideology, or paradigms, favoring the growth of Ecological Systems, is to save species by protecting samples of the entire ecosystems themselves. This can be tested very easily, although not done so by current management agencies — and by determining whether declines of ecosystem types have been accompanied by declines and extinctions of species that depend on or are associated with those ecosystems. What many of us are finding, who are in the field all the time, is overwhelming indeed, and quite obvious.

The fact is – many species are being eliminated by the Bureau of Land Management and due to incompetence as well as blatant ignorance of Ecological-Factors, Wildlife Services, and welfare ranching combined – and one of the primary developing factors of the current 48% Over-Kill of America’s Wildlife, which destroys Ecological Systems, as well.

Conclusion

With a thorough investigation of facts, not of misinformation nor bias toward or favoring any group of facts over another due to special interests, we then conclude that the conservation of entire Ecological Zones/ecosystems, rather than recovery/sustaining of individual species of non-indigenous animals, becomes of paramount priority. Preservation of entire communities requires truthful and sound habitat management based on good science, nothing left out, or added, to favor special interests, and the ability to ascertain or understand the research material and good data recovery, to generate sound management paradigms and decisions. This we find is superior over isolation of certain recovery favored recovery areas.

Due to good data collection, as well as a good understanding and breaking down the data to an informative type of statistics, myself and others find that placing Wild Horses back onto their legitimate, and Legal by Law homelands, is good for all of the Ecological Systems that would make up the ecosystem landscape within its entirety.

john cams and vids maps tableThis also provides for the removal of the actual destructive elements, the non-indigenous cattle – for example, and allow the lands where previous grazing permits did exist, to replenish itself back to its natural habitat of a healthy Ecological system for its inhabitants – and that includes the human species as well. Obtaining a natural wilderness area is far superior, when compared to irresponsible management paradigms that specify a one-person or corporation more important than the taxpayer or American paradigm (nor certainly not of Constitutional grounds) and neglecting all others who are involved, and who pay for it; which, in truth remains environmental-complex areas, entire ecosystems, for use by Special Interests only.

We can no longer afford the Bureau of Land Management statistics that are untrue, for example: the misinformed and lacking information of a 20% growth rate of wild horses, when there are no other situations considered, such as death of wild horses at 18% to 24%, and the birth rates that show beyond a doubt that in the wilds it exists in reality at 51% to a high of +/- 64% undebatable statistics.

We cannot any longer, as well, consider the welfare ranching paradigm as a doable, nor positive situation on America’s Public Lands and within America’s Forests, as it is too destructive to all Ecological Zones and wildlife. And when we consider the actual facts: the less than 1% of sales domestically (DOI/USDAS/GAO Reports) from commercial markets of beef sales receipts; the 34% throw away of commercial beef from non-sales in markets yearly (USDA/GAO reports), and the tremendous amount of activity toward the 48% Over-Kill of America’s wildlife directly related to welfare ranching on Public Lands and Forestry areas — then our conclusion is easily developed by sound reasoning and common sense, also through good science, data gathering, statistics, and facts – welfare ranching is entirely unacceptable as well as unneeded on America’s Federal Lands — entirely.

What one will also discover, is those of us who have no Conflict of Interests, demand that Wild Horses be placed back onto their homelands, and to be allowed to let nature takes its course, and humans, with their bad management and incompetent behaviors, who have wreaked havoc enough within our natural areas and wilderness areas alike. We allow the facts to speak for us, not special interests nor greed, nor conflict of interest!

Literature Read/Information and Sound Data

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Allan, J. D., and A. S. Flecker. 1993. Biodiversity conservation in running waters. BioScience 43:32-43.

Allen, E. B., and L. L. Jackson. 1992. The arid West. Restoration plans and Management Notes 10(1):56-59.

Almand, J. and W. Krohn. 1979. The position of the Bureau of Land Management on the protection and management of riparian ecosystems. Pages 259-361 in R. Johnson and F. McCormick, technical coordinators. Strategies for Protection and Management of Floodplain Wetlands and Other Riparian Ecosystems. Proceedings of the Symposium, 11-13 December 1978, Callaway Gardens, Ga. GTR-WO-12. U.S. Forest Service, Washington, D.C.

Anderson, B. 1991. The swamp bear’s last stand. Nature Conservancy 9/10 1992:16-21. *Arizona Nature Conservancy. 1987. Streams of Life A Conservation Campaign. Arizona Nature Conservancy, Tucson. *Arizona State Parks. 1988. Arizona Wetlands Priority Plan. Arizona State Parks, Phoenix. *Atwood, J. L. 1990. Status review of the California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica). Unpublished technical report. Manomet Bird Observatory, Manomet, Mass.

Atwood, J. L., and R. F. Noss. 1994. Gnatcatchers and development: a “train wreck” avoided? Illahee: Journal of the Northwest Environment 10:123-130.

Austin, M. P., and C. R. Margules. 1986. Assessing representativeness. Pages 45-67 in M. B. Usher, editor. Wildlife Conservation Evaluation. Chapman and Hall, London, United Kingdom.

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[3Asterisk denotes unpublished material or published technical reports.]

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Benke, A. C. 1990. A perspective on America’s vanishing streams. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 91:77-88.

*Betz, R. F. 1978. The prairies of Indiana. Pages 25-31 in D. C. Glenn-Levin and R. Q. Landers, editors. Proceedings of the Fifth Midwest Prairie Conference. Iowa State University, Ames. *Bentzien, M. M. 1987. Agency draft recovery plan for five rockland plant species. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Ga. *Birch, T. W., and E. H. Wharton. 1982. Land use change in Ohio, 1952-79. Research Bulletin NE-70. U.S. Northeast Forest Experiment Station, Broomal, Pa. *Blaustein, A. R. 1993. Declining amphibian populations: A global perspective. Abstract and presentation, 3 March 1993, Newport, Oreg. Annual Meeting, Oregon Chapter, The Wildlife Society.

Bohning-Gaese, K., M. L. Taper, and J. H. Brown. 1993. Are declines in North American insectivorous songbirds due to causes on the breeding range? Conservation Biology 7:7686. *Bolsinger, C. 1988. The hardwoods of California’s timberlands, woodlands, and savannas. PNW-RB-148. U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, Oreg. *Bond, W. E., and A. R. Spillers. 1935. Use of land for forests in the lower Piedmont region of Georgia. Occasional Paper 53, Southern Forest Experiment Station, Asheville, N.C.

Bourgeron, P. S. 1988. Advantages and limitations of ecological classification for the protection of ecosystems. Conservation Biology 2:218-220. *Bourgeron, P. S., and L. Engelking, editors. 1992. Preliminary compilation of a series level classification of the vegetation of the western United States using a physiognomic framework. Report to the Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Western Heritage Task Force, The Nature Conservancy, Boulder, Colo.

Boyce, S. G., and W. H. Martin. 1993. The future of the terrestrial communities of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. Pages 339-366 in W. H. Martin, S. G. Boyce, and A. C. Echternacht, editors. Biodiversity of the Southeastern United States: Upland Terrestrial Communities. Wiley, N.Y. *Brabander, J. J., R. E. Master, and R. M. Short. 1985. Bottomland hardwoods of eastern Oklahoma: A special study of their status, trends, and values. Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Norman, Okla.

Brash, A. R. 1987. The history of avian extinction and forest conversion on Puerto Rico. Biological Conservation 39:97-111.

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Cross-posted from John Cox http://bit.ly/2csth5p

Secret documents from 2008 reveal plan to kill and dispose of America’s wild horses and burros

© 2014 Anne Novak, all rights reserved.

© 2014 Anne Novak, all rights reserved.

 The Bureau of Land Management plots to wipe out wild horses and burros at taxpayer expense.  Is this how you want your tax dollars used?

“Jim says Burns takes them to a pit but they have always used it  . . .”

Notice that Pesticide PZP, made from slaughterhouse pig ovaries, is part of their wipe out plan. It sterilizes after multiple use. Their goal is zero population increase which would ruin natural selection and make it impossible for the species to survive climate change.

Members of the public and some organizations have been fooled into supporting Pesticide PZP as the “lesser of two evils”. Those who believe in the true spirit of the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971 are attacked for speaking out against Pesticide PZP.

Follow the money if you want to understand who profits from forcibly drugging wild mares with Pesticide PZP for population control. . .

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is the registrant of Pesticide PZP https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem_search/reg_actions/pending/fs_PC-176603_01-Jan-12.pdf. HSUS called native wild horses and burros “PESTS” on the EPA Pesticide Application. Have they changed the legal definition of wild horses and burros with the EPA application that should be revoked?

Scott Beckstead, who was born and raised on a working cattle ranch and now works for HSUS, reported at the BoLM’s Spring 2016 Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board meeting that HSUS is experimenting on a stronger form of Pesticide PZP. Does “stronger” mean their new form of Pesticide PZP will forcibly sterilize native wild horses and burros with one injection?

Wild horses and burros are underpopulated on public land which is overpopulated by beef cattle and sheep. Ranchers, BoLM and others try to scapegoat wild horses and burros for range damage when the truth is commercial livestock is destroying, or already has destroyed, the ecosystem.

July 29, 2008

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“GonaCon® is also a product that needs to be relooked at for sterilization of mares.” (Quoted from item 4 above)

Read about the GonaCon® experiment at Water Canyon that launched in 2015: http://protectmustangs.org/?p=8488 They have hopes to use GonaCon™ on the whole Antelope Complex.

 

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August 12, 2008

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PM Aerial Photo 6

Thanks to Jane Cheuvront for the Google Earth photo)

Read our August 11th blog post: What’s in the mounds, craters and pits at American wild horse holding facilities? http://protectmustangs.org/?p=9458

See all the notes from the secret conference calls in 2008 about killing off America’s wild horses and burros: pm-blm-secret-killing-conference-calls-2008

 

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Special thanks to Dr. Patricia Haight, RIP, with the Conquistador Equine Rescue for acquiring the documents through FOIA.

See the draft of the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program Alternative Management Options from October 2008 the result of the secret conference calls: pm-blm-killing-plans

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(Fred T. Woehl, Jr. and Sue McDonnell, PhD. for Wild Horse & Burro Research are some of the Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board members, who voted on September 9, 2016, to kill the alleged “unadoptable” wild horses and burros)

 

Protect Mustangs is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




Underpopulation and fraud

PM-Carl-Mrozek-NV-Mustang-marked
In response to the Washington Post biased article pushing pesticide PZP on underpopulated wild horses and burros
Normal Growth Rate: Horses are a slow-growth species when it comes to reproduction. The gestation-period lasts over 11 months, and a mare produces just 1 foal. Gregg, LeBlanc, and Johnston (2014) found that the birth rate in wild-horse herds is almost 20%. Unfortunately, they also found that 50% of foals perish. At least 5% of adult wild horses also perish every year. Thus, the normal herd-growth rate for wild horses is only about 5%.
Fraudulent Growth Rates: Three herds were featured on the Advisory Board’s tour — Antelope Valley, Goshute, and Spruce Pequop. A review of BLM’s alleged growth figures for these herds showed biologically-implausible increases. From a combined total of 1,440 wild horses in 2013, BLM claimed the herds grew to 3,025 wild horses by 2016, a 110% increase. That would mean a 37% average growth rate, which is 740% times the norm. Moreover, if given a 37% growth rate, then to overcome foal mortality and adult mortality, the average birth rate would have to have been 84% — which is 420% times the normal birth rate. Ben Masters and fellow board members unknowingly “drank the Kool Aid” — they swallowed BLM’s propaganda. Truth be told, the range they toured had previously been overgrazed … by livestock.
Wild horses are underpopulated: Per BLM’s own geneticist, 83% of wild-horse herds suffer from arbitrary management levels (AMLs) set below minimum-viable population. For instance, the AML for Oregon’s Beaty’s Butte herd restricts the stocking-density to 1 wild horse per 7 square miles. If there are 2 wild horses per 7 square miles, BLM can technically declare an “overpopulation” because there is “double the number” that the preposterous AML allows. In contrast, BLM authorizes 119 cattle per 7 square miles. After eliminating 99% of the Beaty’s Butte herd, BLM replaced the wild horses with cattle to accommodate a rancher, who had secured a contract to supply grass-fed beef to an upscale grocery chain.
by Marybeth Devlin
Advisory Board Member for Protect Mustangs
Member of the Alliance for Wild Horses and Burros

Protect Mustangs is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org




False Win: Is the Bureau of Land Management retaining the right to kill “unadoptable” wild horses and those over 10-years-old despite public outcry?

PM IA GAIA #8402 Carson July 2016

The Bureau of Land Management has responded to public pressure but is NOT saying they won’t kill the wild horses and burros in holding. Read the emails below.

“The news circulating in the press is designed to put out the fire of public outcry. As long as the Bureau of Land Management has the legal right due to the Burns Amendment to give wild horses 3-Strikes, KILL alleged “unadoptable” wild horses and those over 10 years old then nothing has changed.” –Anne Novak, executive director of Protect Mustangs

This is what the Bureau of Land Management has posted on their website:

Question: What is the BLM’s response to the recommendation made by the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board on September 9, 2016, to sell without limitation or humanely euthanize excess horses and burros in BLM’s off-range corrals and pastures that are deemed “unadoptable”?

Answer: The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board is an independent panel comprised of members of the public that make recommendations to the Bureau of Land Management regarding its management of wild horses and burros. The BLM is committed to having healthy horses on healthy rangelands. We will continue to care for and seek good homes for animals that have been removed from the range. Currently, there are more than 67,000 wild horses and burros on public rangelands, and the BLM is caring for nearly 50,000 animals in off-range corrals and pastures.

“Bureau of Land Management Director Neil Kornze told a congressional panel yesterday that the agency has no plans to follow the recommendation of an advisory panel that has called on BLM to euthanize potentially thousands of wild horses it cannot sell or adopt.” — Energy & Environment News

Statement from Anne Novak, Founder and Executive Director of Protect Mustangs: We have seen the Bureau of Land Management slither back after public outcry before and that is all this is. Their statement says nothing about not killing or stopping unlimited sales to slaughterhouse middlemen. Legally it is still an option to them. Therefore it is more important than ever to keep the #NoKill pressure on and to push for wild horses and burros to be returned to freedom. There is no evidence of overpopulation, period. Independent head counts of all the wild horses in holding and in the wild are urgent now to uncover the truth. How many are really left?

PM Poppy #1196 3-Strike PVC FB

We contacted Tom Gorey, Senior Public Affairs Specialist at Bureau of Land Management today to confirm the information circulating in the press and asked the bureau if they retained the right to KILL the “unadoptable” wild horses and burros and those over 10-years-old and have not received a clear response. Our last email was not answered. Read the emails below:

 

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: RE: Is the BLM going to kill the wild horses in holding?
From: <anne@protectmustangs.org>
Date: Thu, September 15, 2016 12:56 pm
To: “Gorey, Thomas (Tom)” <tgorey@blm.gov>

The statement says nothing really. So kindly answer my question. Does the BLM reserve the right to kill “unadoptable” wild horses and burros as well as those over 10-years-old?

Anne Novak

Executive Director

Protect Mustangs

Read about native wild horses: http://protectmustangs.org/?page_id=562  

www.ProtectMustangs.org

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization who protects and preserves native and wild horses. Please donate to help the mustangs.

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: Re: Is the BLM going to kill the wild horses in holding?

From: “Gorey, Thomas (Tom)” <tgorey@blm.gov>

Date: Thu, September 15, 2016 12:08 pm

To: Annee Novak <anne@protectmustangs.org>

Cc: Dean Bolstad <dbolstad@blm.gov>

The statement says nothing about reserving a right.

On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 3:04 PM, <anne@protectmustangs.org> wrote:

So the Bureau of Land Management reserves the right to kill wild horses and burros to dispose of them?

Anne Novak

Executive Director

Protect Mustangs

Read about native wild horses: http://protectmustangs.org/?page_id=562  

 www.ProtectMustangs.org

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization who protects and preserves native and wild horses. Please donate to help the mustangs.

——– Original Message ——–

Subject: Re: Is the BLM going to kill the wild horses in holding?

From: “Gorey, Thomas (Tom)” <tgorey@blm.gov>

Date: Thu, September 15, 2016 10:40 am

To: Anne Novak <anne@protectmustangs.org>

http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en.html

http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/whbprogram/history_and_facts/from_the_public.html#Brd_Rec

Question: What is the BLM’s response to the recommendation made by the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board on September 9, 2016, to sell without limitation or humanely euthanize excess horses and burros in BLM’s off-range corrals and pastures that are deemed “unadoptable”?

Answer: The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board is an independent panel comprised of members of the public that make recommendations to the Bureau of Land Management regarding its management of wild horses and burros.  The BLM is committed to having healthy horses on healthy rangelands.  We will continue to care for and seek good homes for animals that have been removed from the range.  Currently, there are more than 67,000 wild horses and burros on public rangelands, and the BLM is caring for nearly 50,000 animals in off-range corrals and pastures.

On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 1:35 PM, <anne@protectmustangs.org> wrote:

Dear Mr. Gorey,

Kindly send me your statement. Thank you.

Anne Novak

Executive Director

Protect Mustangs

Read about native wild horses: http://protectmustangs.org/?page_id=562  

www.ProtectMustangs.org

Protect Mustangs is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization who protects and preserves native and wild horses. Please donate to help the mustangs.

PM Lennox

Our petitions still stand:
1.) Investigate the Wild Horse & Burro Count in Captivity and in Freedom https://www.change.org/p/u-s-senate-investigate-the-wild-horse-burro-count-in-captivity-and-freedom This is VERY important to clean up the program, the fraud and stop the roundups, slaughter and right to kill because the BLM is lazy about adopting
2.) #NoKill 45,000 wild horses and put them back on public land 
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/907/592/301/demand-nokill-45000-wild-horses-burros-in-holding Still valid despite BLM’s news. Legally they have the right to kill our cherished mustangs and burros. Until the law is changed and the loophole is closed we need to get them back on public land and to safety.
3.) Defund to Stop the Wild Horse and Burro Roundups and Slaughter https://www.change.org/p/defund-and-stop-the-wild-horse-burro-roundups Still valid to stop cruel roundups, unlimited sales, and killing of our native wild horses because of a loophole in the law. 
 
4.) Congress & President: Stop Slaughter & Experiments on 100,000 Wild Horses & Burros 
https://www.change.org/p/president-of-the-united-states-congress-president-stop-sterilization-slaughter-of-100-000-wild-horses-burros Even though BoLM is backing down on the sterilization surgeries, they still continue with injectable sterilization experiments–just like Dr. Mengele did.

The petitions are working so keep sharing to double the numbers and keep the pressure on. Take the cover page of the petitions with you when you go to meet with your elected officials or include them in your handwritten letters and email.

Protect Mustangs is a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the protection and preservation of native and wild horses. www.ProtectMustangs.org