How will #fracking affect Elko County?

  • Larry Hyslop/Correspondent Elko Daily Free Press

cross-posted for educational purposes

Let me start by saying I have no answer to the above question. If Noble Energy does indeed develop wells using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, what will that mean to Elko County residents?

Noble Energy has held informative meetings and told us everything will be fine, that fracking will be good for the county. They said there is not a single proven case of fracking chemicals contaminating drinking water aquifers, and other problems either will not occur here or have been overblown.

However, it is difficult to accept these facts with so many other states having problems. What worries me most is we will not know the problems we face until operations are well underway and it is too late to change things.

A quick Internet search using “fracking problems” followed by various state names brought up long lists of articles, including these below.

• NBC News reported fracking wastewater appears to be linked to earthquakes in an Ohio town that has not seen past quakes. The state has ordered an indefinite moratorium on fracking within three miles of the earthquake epicenters. Not only am I alarmed at the thought of fracking causing seismic activity, but Elko lies in an area of high seismic activity. In 2008, if fracking operations had been in place near Wells, what would have happened because of that earthquake?

• The Washington Post reported Pennsylvania drilling for natural gas caused “significant damage” to drinking-water aquifers. The Texas Tribune reported that due to the recent drought, oil and gas companies may run short of needed water for operations in South Texas.

• Time magazine reported the House Energy and Commerce Committee found that 14 of the country’s most active hydraulic fracturing companies used 866 million gallons of fracking chemicals between 2005 and 2009. This does not include water, which makes up 99 percent of the fluid injected into wells.

• The Herald-Standard newspaper reported Williston, N.D. has a large methamphetamine drug problem brought in by a gang selling drugs among the oil workers.

• Governing the States and Localities website reports North Dakota roads, designed for farm-to-market travel, are not holding up under the big trucks accessing rigs and wells. On the Jiggs Highway, what effect will heavy truck traffic have on this small highway?

So help me out. Help me find an answer by telling me what you think. Will fracking be good or bad for Elko County? Are the possible problems overblown? If you believe fracking will cause problems, which ones do you worry about the most? Email me at hyslop.nv@gmail.com and put “fracking” in the subject line.

In two weeks I will report the results. I will not be able to quote your complete comments, but will report the consensus of responses.

# # #

(6) comments

freewillie

The USGS says all industrial uses of water, including mining, use about 20 billion gallons per day. According to Mr. Hyslop the top 14 (IOW most all) companies engaged in hydraulic fracturing operations use (derived from the quoted 866 million gallons per 5 years x 100 to one water ratio) about 50 million gallons of water per day – 1/400 of industrial usage. When the same math is done for the 270 billion per day for all water usage in the US it’s 2/10,000. I’m not real worried.

freewillie

Before someone points out the obvious, Mr. Hyslop did not make this assertion, the article he quoted did.

Bland

Search the Net for anything + problems and you will get thousands of hits leading to articles that, unsurprisingly, detail problems. Which of these are worth consideration then becomes the issue. Since the level of bizarre claims by people looking for and, again unsurprisingly, finding “problems” seems to runs around a 100% it’s naive to give most the time of day. Try Googling “obama birth certificate” or “truth 911” for a taste of what I mean. The examples you site aren’t much better.

Bland

As an example of how misleading a search for problems can be, a full reading of The Washington Post story referenced shows one guy at the USEPA issued a report about methane in water in Penn. – a report that not only contradicts the final report that settled this matter by his own EPA but one that details gas in water that occurs naturally in that area anyway, is completely non-toxic in water anyway and has also long ago been ruled inconsequential by the Penn. State EPA.

powwowgirl

You need to do the research yourself
What is the Halliburton loop hole
What is horizontal drilling
What is in fracking fluid
How much water does it take to drill a well
Why is regulations on private land wells different than public land
How far back from the well is the water tested
How long do fracking jobs last
finally why did a family in Aruba Texas recently awarded 3 million dollars in a fracking poisoning case

powwowgirl

A family in Aruba Texas just was awarded 3 million for poisoning them. Headwated for the Humbolt river is the Mary’s River Valley. Ground water always follows surface water. Good luck with that North Texas!

Nellie Diamond (#0484) has 3-Strikes and BoLM is offering her for Sale

It’s not her fault she wasn’t picked! Help Nellie Diamond (#0484) find a safe home.

PM 3-Strike Nellie Diamond 10620484 for Sale

Nellie Diamond (#0484) is on the Internet Adoption and offered for sale $25. She seems to have been deeply hurt by losing her home and her herd after the Bureau of Land Management (BoLM) roundup 3 years ago. No one is taking the time to see beyond her loneliness. Nellie Diamond might do well with a sister mustang from her herd–the Diamonds out of Nevada. Once she is treated with love, patience and respect Nellie will shine like a Diamond too.

Here is the online application: https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/howtoadopt.php

Nellie can be shipped out to any of the locations listed below for free and then you need to transport her home from there.

BoLM says:

Sex: Mare Age: 6 Years   Height (in hands): 13.3

Necktag #: 0484   Date Captured: 02/03/13

Freezemark: 10620484   Signalment Key: HF1AAAAAG

Color: Gray   Captured: Diamond (NV)

Notes:

Tag-#0484. 6 year old gray mare rounded up from the Diamond Herd Management Area in Nevada in February of 2013.

This wild horse is currently located in Palomino Valley, NV.  For more information, please contact Jeb Beck at (775) 475-2222 or e-mail: j1beck@blm.gov

This wild horse is available for sale or adoption with bids staring at $25.00. At the conclusion of the bidding, the successful bidder will inform the BoLM if they are purchasing or adopting the animal. If the animal is purchased, not adopted, the successful bidder receives bill of sale to the animal upon completion of payment and final paperwork. If the animal is adopted, the minimum bid must be $125, and the animal is not eligible for title until the one year anniversary.

Pick up options (by appt): Palomino Valley, NV; Delta, UT; Elm Creek, NE; Pauls Valley, OK.

Other pick up options: Ewing, IL (September 3) ; Mequon, WI (September 16); Clemson, SC (September 23); Loxahatchee, FL (September 30); and Murray, KY (October 7).

Adoption confirmation for this wild horse must be finalized, by e-mail to BLM_ES_INET_Adoption@blm.gov, no later than Noon Mountain August 4. After this date, all unclaimed wild horses will be available for in-person walk up adoption/purchase ONLY.

Diamond Complex Herd Management Areas

The Complex involves three HMAs, and areas outside of HMAs: the Diamond HMA is managed by the Battle Mountain District, the Diamond Hills North HMA by the Elko District and the Diamond Hills South (and areas outside of HMA boundaries) by the Ely District. Because the wild horses move around the HMAs across the Diamond Mountain Range, the three Districts work together to manage the Complex, according to BoLM.

PM Diamond Helicopter Roundup

Protect Mustangs is an organization who protects and preserves native and wild horses.




Comment against BLM getting rid of wild horses to help those monsters #frack for oil and gas!

BLM Seeks Public Comment on Public Lands Nominated for Oil and Gas Exploration and Development

ELKO, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Elko District Environmental Assessment (EA) for parcels of public land nominated for lease in the 2015 Competitive Oil & Gas Lease Sale is available for review. These parcels have the potential for future oil and gas exploration and development. The 30-day public review period concludes October 29, 2014.

The 24 parcels totaling 25,802.47 acres have been analyzed for potential impacts in the EA in accordance with the Oil & Gas Leasing Reform mandated in 2010.

Lease stipulations identified in the Elko (1987) and Wells (1985) Resource Management Plans are attached to applicable parcels to help protect resources. The EA is available for public review at: http://on.doi.gov/1rxlD8j

Inside the EA you will find information about how American wild horses will be impacted on page 64. It reads:

3.2.17 Wild Horses

Existing Conditions

There are 8 wild horse herd management areas (HMA) managed by the Elko District Office. They are the Owyhee, Rock Creek, Little Humboldt, Diamond Hills North, Maverick-Medicine, Antelope Valley, Goshute, and Spruce-Pequop HMAs. These eight HMAs total approximately 1.8 million acres and have an appropriate management level (AML) of 1,338 wild horses. Wild horses inhabit these HMAs year round. Deferred parcels 13 and 14 are within the Maverick /Medicine HMA and parcels 15 through 26 are located in the Antelope Valley HMA. The other parcels are not located within HMAs.

Effects of the Proposed Alternative

There are no direct impacts to wild horses associated with leasing, however wild horses can be found within some of the HMAs and future exploration could affect wild horses within those HMAs. Increased human and motorized activity could disrupt and displace wild horses. The wild horses inhabiting the area of the exploration could leave the area and move away from the noise and activity. During any long term or permanent activity it is probable that wild horses over time would become accustomed to the activity and resume normal activities at a reasonable distance. Construction of new fences as part of development production facilities could disrupt movement of free roaming wild horses and animals could be injured by colliding with any new fences.

Mitigations

Construction of fencing within a HMA would be evaluated during review of any development proposal to determine if flagging or other measures would be necessary to increase visibility to wild horses. Best management practices along with specific restrictions would be implemented to minimize negative impacts to wild horses.

The Competitive Oil and Gas Lease Sale will be conducted on March​10, 2015.

If you have issues or concerns or need more information, contact Tom Schmidt, Project Lead at the BLM Elko District, at (775) 753-0200 or email at elfoweb@blm.gov

 

Watch the telling film Wild Horses and Renegades expose the truth behind wild horse roundups and removals.  You can go to https://vimeo.com/ondemand/wildhorses to watch the documentary. Here’s a rough preview:

 

 

Josh Fox’s Oscar nominated GASLAND I explains how tracking ruins the environment and our water especially. Available on Netflix.

 

GASLAND 2 explains how the oil and gas lobbies control democracy, putting us all at risk and poisoning our water in order to become a world leader in exporting liquid natural gas. There is a nice segment linking wild horse roundups with fracking in Wyoming. Here’s a trailer for Fox’s GASLAND 2. You can also watch the film on Netflix.

 

Sign and share the petition against tracking in wild horse land: https://www.change.org/p/sen-dianne-feinstein-don-t-frack-wild-horse-land

BLM ensures wild horses will have water

Cross-posted from the Elko Daily Free Press
October 11, 2013 4:45 pm  •  By DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS 

ELKO — Reports that wild horses were without water prompted local Bureau of Land Management to investigate this week.

Contracted water hauler Jackie Wiscombe told the county commission Wednesday that the federal government shutdown had prohibited her from watering wild horses in Ruby Valley and Deer Springs, an area about 15 miles north of Currie.

She said she was concerned the animals were dying of thirst. The road to Deer Springs had been washed out, Wiscombe added, and she was unable to drive to the guzzlers.

Alerted by the news, BLM Elko District Director Jill Silvey said an employee was sent to Deer Springs to check on water and horse conditions.

The BLM employee was able to get to Deer Springs on a road that had some washout but was passable, Silvey said. The employee also reported that the horse guzzler still had water.

The employee didn’t see any horses, but because water was available, she said, the BLM believes the horses to be in good shape.

Silvey was unsure where the communication broke down, but said hauling water to the horses is an essential service and the BLM didn’t intend for Wiscombe to stop watering the two areas.

Wiscombe said she was contacted Thursday night and told that she should have received an email and voice message when the shutdown began, telling her to continue hauling water.

Wiscombe is also unsure how the miscommunication occurred, but couldn’t recall getting an email.

In any event, Wiscombe said she’s glad to be working with the agency again.

“I like working with this BLM office,” she said, “and they really do care about these wild horses.”

Mostly, she’s happy to be watering horses again.

On Friday she hauled water to Ruby Valley where the tubs were “bone dry.”

Wiscombe said she didn’t see any horses but did find fresh horse tracks near the guzzlers.

“I filled them up,” she said. “And I’ll go fill them back up in a few days.”

Commissioner Demar Dahl said Wednesday he could help fix a road if it was impassable.

Wiscombe said she would keep in contact with the commission if the road needed repair.

The Elko District BLM office is closed. Almost all of its employees have been on furlough since Oct. 1, when the federal government shut down.

Link to the Elko Daily Free Press: http://elkodaily.com/news/blm-horses-have-water/article_3abd77c2-32cf-11e3-9b92-0019bb2963f4.html?comment_form=true