Conversation about fertility control with Brett Hass, retired biologist previously with NSA (part 1)

Don’t let pesticides like Gonacon™, PZP or SpayVac® manage native wild horses to extinction. The Spin Dr.’s and some ignorant horse advocates are pushing fertility control on underpopulated wild horses. Know the truth and expose those spewing the spin.

PM Gonacon Pesticide Fact Sheet

Read the entire Gonacon™ Pesticide Fact Sheet


John Cox: Brett, you’re a retired biologist, previously with the NSA for how many years?

Brett Hass: 46 long years John. We met in Vietnam, when we a lot younger my friend (smiles). We were doing wildlife and vegetation studies in your AO (area of operations). That was my first assignment with the NSA, as a matter of fact.

John Cox: Let’s cut through all of that. What do you think of Gonacon™ and some of the other fertility controls BLM is using?

Brett Hass: As usual, and as government agencies do and BLM and DOI are extremely guilty, they pretend that science guides its wild horse and burro management strategies. So the agencies involved go forth and resolve issues, supposedly, with experimental drugs–in this case GonaCon™. The question is, in reality, does it resolve anything at all, or is it simply to further experimentations with this drug and the wild horses the most expendable of situations currently?

The problem is very obvious, with the first-time use of an experimental drug, they act like children with a new toy–but this toy is extremely dangerous, to not only the horses and actually lead them to extinction, but the environmental consequences are apparently neglected entirely? (shakes his head negatively). . .

But let’s get real, the very absence of science contradicts any time of sound reasoning for its use whatsoever. So once again we have a government agency, using a Nazi-Type experimental fertility drug on horses and other wildlife–without knowing, or even acknowledging for that matter, what the long-term consequences are–or in perception–the problems that will arise in its actual use.

There is no resolution, as I reviewed the population situation and see first hand there is no over-population if wild horses just within the BLM numbers alone; but livestock, that is a completely different matter, in reality.

John Cox: In your appraisal of the information you’ve read, would you, as a tenured Wildlife Biologist for over 50 years, use this drug?

Brett Hass: Absolutely not! There is no pertinent reasoning to use it right now and especially on wild horses or much of anything else for that matter. Our wildlife and environment is simply too important to be so frivolous with such activity, especially an unknown situation, as fertility drugs used in our natural environment. But as you say, ignorance is quite something, and our government seems to portray ignorance quite well, and frankly the only situation they seem to be competent to accomplish.

Much more on this discussion with Brett Hass later . . .


Below is the original PZP Pesticide Fact Sheet before HSUS seems to have lobbied the EPA to make changes to the chemical class. It’s still only approved as a pesticide to manage pests. PZP is made from slaughterhouse pig ovaries mixed with modified freund’s complete adjuvant.

PM PZP Test mares

(American wild horses used in fertility control experiments)

© John Cox, printed with permission

John Cox is a Vietnam Vet, living in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest who writes about the environment. He’s passionate about saving America’s wild horse herds and wolves. 

Read John Cox’s blog at:

Have you read about the Gonacon™ Experiment on the Water Canyon herd and the UNLUCKY 11 orphans? It all started as a PZP proposal and went down the slippery slope. . .  Read about it here:

Call, Write & Tweet @GOVSandoval #Nevada Governor Sandoval is allowing #wildhorses to be sold at auction ~ Kill buyers attend

PM HV Rambo's band

Rambo’s band in freedom in Reno (Photo © Ellen Holcomb)

Beloved wild horses at auction against the public’s wishes

Right now 41 wild horses from the Reno area including Rambo’s band are at the Fallon Auction where kill buyers come to buy horses for slaughter.

Governor Sandoval refused to step in and stop the auction despite protests. Read his response here:

Advocates and concerned citizens are hoping to save these iconic mustangs from being sold into the slaughter pipeline.

We have been in touch with Shannon Windle, President of the Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund who has arrived at the scene and is working on saving horses. She said there are a lot of horses.

Contact Governor Sandoval to tell him you don’t want native wild horses sold at auctions where kill buyers shop. Ask him to give the horses to local advocacy groups rather than sell them into the slaughter pipeline.

Call, email and/or fax Nevada’s Governor Brian Sandoval,

Office Phone: (775) 684-5670

Office Fax: (775) 684-5683

Tweet ©GOVSandoval  Use #NEVADA to let the Governor.

Let the Nevada Bureau of Tourism know you don’t like this! @TravelNevada on Twitter and

Mailing Address

Nevada Commission on Tourism
401 North Carson Street
Carson City, NV 89701

Call Us

  • Direct: (775) 687-4322
  • Toll-free: 1-800-NEVADA-8
  • Fax: (775) 687-6779
Protect native wild horses! © Protect

Protect native wild horses! © Protect


BREAKING NEWS: Oakland to protest Reno’s wild horses facing slaughter

Reno: Damonte wild horses trapped w/ cruelty

Nevada trapper drags 4 month old foal by string around neck to send to auction (Photo © Bo Rodriguez)

For immediate release:

BREAKING NEWS: Bay Area Residents Protest Killing Wild Horses near Reno

Barbie Hardrock stands up for American mustangs from Europe

OAKLAND, Ca. (January 4, 2013)–Protect Mustangs, the Bay Area-based wild horse preservation group is organizing a peaceful protest during rush hour tonight outside the Rockridge BART Station (College Ave. in Oakland) from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Members of the public of all ages are gathering to show they want the cruelty & slaughter of indigenous wild horses to stop now. The preservation group recently learned of Nevada’s interest in opening a horse slaughterhouse to kill wild horses on tribal land near Reno. Many protests are being held in conjunction with the Carson City Protest, organized by the Wild Horse Preservation League, where the protestors are marching at midday to deliver Governor Sandoval letters from around the world asking him to stop the cruelty and let the advocates help the horses find homes or sanctuary.

“We stand together to demand a STOP to the crimes against America’s indigenous wild horses,” explains Anne Novak, executive director of Protect Mustangs. “We enjoy photographing the very horses they want to slaughter when we go to Reno/Tahoe. These horses are on the edge of Reno. Did you know horses evolved in America and wild horses are a reintroduced native species?”

“We have been working with The Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund and other groups to bring awareness to the crisis,” continues Novak. “The public around the world is outraged. Some people even refuse to travel to Nevada because of this. Citizens have requested Governor Sandoval stop trapping native wild horses and selling them off at auctions–where kill-buyers go to pick up horses. He has done nothing–only turned a deaf ear.”

Other protests are being held such as the primary one in Carson City, one in Mill Valley tonight at The Depot Plaza sponsored by Wild horse Protection Act as well as protests held in Phoenix, on the East Coast, Europe and elsewhere.

“We are sharing out posts of people protesting today from around the world. Our first photo came in from Barbie Hardrock’s band, Roquette, in Europe,” says Kerry Becklund, director of outreach for Protect Mustangs. “Join the movement to protect wild horses on Facebook”

“American mustangs are so beautiful to watch living in freedom but now they are hard to find because there aren’t many left,” explains Hardrock who enjoys visiting the American West to take photos of wild horses.

“Native wild horses create biodiversity and reverse desertification when managed using reserve design,” states Novak. “Roundups and removals are cruel–slaughtering them is a heinous idea. We want to make sure they are protected.”

# # #

Media Contacts:

Anne Novak, 415-531-8454,

Kerry Becklund, 510-502-1913,

Contact us for photos, video and interviews

Links of Interest:

BREAKING: Shocking meeting minutes reveal Nevada wants to slaughter wild horses! Read them here:

News reporting:–Wild-Horse-Slaughter

Protect Mustangs in the news:

America’s wild horses are native:

Requests to Governor Sandoval:

Barbie Hardrock protest photo:

Rocquette’s website:

The law and the BLM roundups:

Mill Valley protest sponsored by Wild Horse Protection Act. Jan 4th 5:00-7:00 pm at the Depot Plaza. Info here:

Here are ways you can take action: information here:

Sponsored by Protect Mustangs where you can find a lot of information on the wild horse crisis.

Protect Mustangs is the California-based preservation group whose mission is to educate the public about the American wild horse, protect and research wild horses on the range and help those who have lost their freedom.

Barbie Hardrock joins Protect Mustangs' Oakland protest through the web (Photo © Rocquette)

Barbie Hardrock joins Protect Mustangs’ Oakland protest through the web (Photo © Rocquette)


Rally to Save Nevada’s Wild Horses from Slaughter ~ January 4th

PM HV Girl with sign trap to slaughter
Protect mustangs & Stop the cruelty!
Make signs, bring friends and join the rally on Friday, January 4, 2012 (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) in front of the Legislative Building (Hwy 395 East) in downtown Carson City, Nevada.

If you can’t come to Nevada then hold a peaceful protest in your hometown and send us your photos. We will post them here. Even one person can have a protest. Well traveled roads with lots of traffic are great spots for small protests.

Are you aware the federal officials discussed a plan to kill most of the native wild horses left in America? Read: Outrage over secret documents planning to kill or slaughter 50,000 native wild horses!

Feel free to send us an email with any questions

Photo by Bo Rodriguez


From Bonnie Matton:

Well, as you all know by now, we are battling the Nevada Department of Agriculture to get them to stop sending our Virginia Range Horses + horses from other areas as well – to auction: MEANING TO SLAUGHTER.

So, we are having an emergency rally on Friday, January 4, 2012 (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) in front of the Legislative Building (Hwy 395 East) in downtown Carson City.    Sorry for the last minute notice.  We have to have it before the next auction which is on January 9, 2013.  NO TIME TO LOSE.

We are calling it “Slaughter is not the Answer.”  We will have flyers to pass out to press and others. Would appreciate your emailing me of  how many people will be coming from your area and where you are coming from.

Many of you have participated in demonstrations before. Please come at least 1/2 hour before the rally begins (in the park area next to the Legislative Building) so you can receive instructions (especially if you’ve never attended a demonstration before).  There are certain regulations we must abide with. The Legislative police have always welcomed us wild horse advocates because we are polite and follow their directions.

After the rally, we will be marching to the Governor’s Building (which is next door to the Legislative Building and close to where we gathered before the rally). Shannon Windle, President of Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund, will then bring hundreds of letters directly up to the Governor’s office – letters she has been gathering for some time opposing what NDA is doing with Nevada’s Treasures.

You are welcome to make up signs and bring them with you. We have lots in our storage shed which will work and I’ll bring them as well.  You are also welcome to bring your organizational signs.

The easiest place to park is if you drive down Stewart Street. There’s usually plenty of parking directly behind the Legislative Building, which is convenient for carrying signs and tables to our setup area.


Urgent donations, foster homes and adopters needed for historic mustangs or kill buyers will get them

Captured wild horses Nevada Jan 2012 (Photo © Anne Novak, all rights reserved.)

Wild Horse Annie’s horses are being pushed through the livestock auction again next Wednesday September 26th in Fallon, Nevada.

Update 10:30 p.m.

“Miracles are happening. Hidden Valley has found a large pasture for the 25 wild horses for tomorrow as a very, very temporary holding area. Thank heavens.” ~Anne Novak


Update 6:00 p.m.

News 4 Reno aired Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund’s call for help here.

Update at 5:50 p.m. Tuesday September 25, 2012:

“I just got off the phone with Shannon Windle, President of Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund. She’s still at her 9-5 job and told me that only $13,000 has been raised so far to buy the horses but that’s not enough to house them.

She will look into other donations coming in when she gets home from her day job. I have heard other groups are raising money for this and we are so grateful that everyone is helping save these wild horses.

We have been looking for solutions because the foster care pens are maxed out and it’s hard to find people with 6 foot fencing to hold in the wild ones. She decided that getting panels to build more corrals is a good solution. So Hidden Valley is raising money for the corral panels and looking for horse people with extra space who are willing to foster Wild Horse Annie’s beloved Virginia Range horses. Hidden Valley will provide the corrals, feed and is responsible for vet care, etc.

Tomorrow is the auction. Hidden Valley cannot save the wild horses from the kill-buyers if they don’t have the money to purchase them and if they don’t have a place to put them. Pray for miracles and take action to save these historic wild horses.”

In gratitude,

Anne Novak

Executive Director for Protect Mustangs


Check back for upates



Wild War Horse (Photo © Cynthia Smalley, all rights reserved.)

Update from Sunday September 23, 2012

“It’s 10:30 p.m. Sunday night and I just finished talking with Shannon Windle, president of Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund. She told me they only have $3,300. in donations to buy the 25 wild horses next Wednesday September 26th. Last week they paid $11,000. for 23 wild horses. If the money isn’t raised they can’t buy the horses. Please help save these horses from the kill-buyers. Please donate and save a life.” ~Anne Novak, executive director of Protect Mustangs

Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund was prepared financially to save the first South Reno 23 but their funding and foster care is maxed out so here is what we need to do:

  1. Raise money for Hidden Valley to get the South Reno 25 horses at auction, pay for feed, care and transportation
  2. Find adopters in and out of state.
  3. Send the Sept 19th wild horses to adopters ASAP
  4. Recruit new foster care for the new load coming in Wednesday
  5. Line up adopters for the Sept 26th wild horses
  6. Get hay donations to feed all these horses
  7. Get 150 MUSTANG panels to house the Sept 26th load of horses

Because the livestock auction staff likes to bid against the wild horse advocates to jack up the price and their commission, the small wild horses are going for up to 3 times the market value of a heavier horse. A mare and foal pair sold for $1000 last week.

The foster-cares are full after last week’s rescue of 23 Virginia Range horses. So we need to create solutions and build more corrals with panels to hold 25 more horses until we can adopt them out.

Mustang panels are 6 ft high and must be made of sturdy steel. We found a bulk price of $126. a piece. Hidden Valley needs 150 panels.

Let’s all chip in whatever we can and hope the auction house will be compassionate this week and not bid against us.

Laura Bell filming the Reno 23 saved by Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund on September 19, 2012 (Photo © Cat Kindsfather)

Please send your donations to save Wild Horse Annie’s horses directly to Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund:

You can also send a check/money order to:

Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund
P.O. Box 20052
Reno, NV 89515-0052

For information about donating, fostering or adopting please call:

Shannon Windle: 775-297-2955

Anne Novak: 415-531-8454

Thank you for doing what you can to help save America’s wild horses from going to slaughter.

Protect Mustangs flag designed by Robin Warren


Breaking News: Horse lovers from around the world unite to save Nevada’s wild horses from kill-buyers

Advocates were bidding against auction house staff who kept raising the bids

Virginia Range Wild Horses @ Peace (Photo ©Anne Novak, all rights reserved.)

For immediate release:

RENO, Nevada (September 20, 2012) –Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund spearheaded and saved 23 historic Virginia Range wild horses from going to the kill-buyers last night. The herculean effort lead by Shannon Windle, president of Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund. Country singer Lacy Dalton’s non-profit, Let ‘Em Run Foundation, also raised funds for the rescue.

“We are very grateful everyone joined together to save the horses from Wild Horse Annie’s herd,” says Shannon Windle, president of Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund.

Last night many wild horse advocates and groups from the greater Reno area joined forces to help with transportation and foster care to make this rescue effort a success. The list includes the Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund, Let ‘Em Run Foundation, Least Resistance Training Concepts (LRTC) Horse Power and The Starlight Sanctuary with support from many other groups in the West. The efforts were coordinated through the Alliance of Wild Horse Advocates.

California-based Protect Mustangs joined in to help with outreach, raise awareness about the issue and contact Nevada’s Governor Brian Sandoval to stop the sale.

Donors contributed from across the USA and abroad to save Nevada’s indigenous wild horses from being sold to kill-buyers who sell the horses to slaughter plants for human consumption in foreign countries.

A staff member of the auction house was bidding as well as a kill-buyer against the wild horse advocates. Is it legal for the house to drive up the bids?

“How much did the auction house make with the owner driving the price up? ” asks Windle “Is this illegal?”

During the auction, a thin Virginia Range wild horse mare sold for over $500. while a stocky domestic buckskin sold for $200. A wild mare and foal sold for $1000 which is grossly abnormal at a livestock auction frequented by kill-buyers.

Advocates paid more than $11K to save the 23 wild horses–more than three times above market value.

31 additional wild horses will arrive at the auction house next week. More than 60 wild horses have been rounded up and face a horrific end if more foster homes, adopters and donors are not found quickly.

Essential donations are also needed to feed the wild horses rescued last night who will live in foster care until they are adopted or accepted into a sanctuary.

Send donations to the Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund here:

Governor Brian Sandoval ignored public outcry and took no action to save America’s iconic wild horses from going to an auction frequented by kill-buyers tonight.

“We hope Governor Sandoval realizes that outside of Nevada 80% of Americans are against horse slaughter,” explains Anne Novak, executive director of California-based Protect Mustangs. “This could be a pivotal point in his political career–the point where he tarnishes himself to the extent that he will never win the hearts of the 80%. He still has time to take action and become a hero and we hope he does.”

# # #

Follow Protect Mustangs on Facebook for updates

Media Contacts:

Anne Novak, 415-531-8454,

Kerry Becklund, 510-502-1913,

Links of interest:

News 4 reported on the story last night:

News 4 reporting continues:

Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund:

Let ‘Em Run Foundation:

Lacy Dalton bio, president of Let ‘Em Run Foundation:

Least Resistance Training Concepts:

Starlight Sanctuary

Governor Brian Sandoval:

Plea to Governor Sandoval to stop Nevada from selling wild horses to killer-buyers at auctions:

Information on the Virginia Range wild horses:

Protect Mustangs:

Governor Sandoval: Stop the sale of Nevada’s wild horses to kill-buyers

Governor Brian Sandoval ~ Photo from Wikimedia Commons

Call Governor Brian Sandoval and politely let him know you want the trapping and selling of Nevada’s indigenous wild horses at auctions frequented by “kill-buyers” to STOP now.

80% of Americans are against horse slaughter.

Does he want Nevada to stay on the top of the bad list as perceived by Nevadans and everyone else?

The first auction is this Wednesday in Fallon, N.V.–a town where he once lived.

More than 22 Virginia Range wild horses from ‘The Meadow’, on the outskirts of Reno, are going to be sold by the pound. Kill-buyers will be bidding on America’s icons to sell them to slaughter for human consumption in foreign countries.

Politely ask Governor Sandoval to step in–to stop the removals and the sales. Ask him to RELOCATE all the wild horses who have been trapped already by the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDOA) and bring them food and water if needed on the range.

Rotten development planning and urban sprawl is removing habitat from wildlife–including wild horses. Not only is the sprawl causing global warming but now it’s causing strife in communities over wild horses.

It’s the developers’ responsibility to fence out wildlife to prevent entry on their property if that is what they wish. Nevada is a “fence out” state by law.

Back in August several wild horses were taken by people connected with a development. The horses ended up at the prison where they process wild horses to go to the auction frequented by kill-buyers. Who were these people and are charges being prosecuted against them? Are they connected to the current trappings at a development now conducted by the NDOA?

Taxpayers should not pay for the NDOA to remove wild horses when the developer is not taking responsibility for putting up fencing. Nevada wants fiscal responsibility.

Land development does not need to ruin indigenous wild horse habitat, break their families apart and sell them at auctions where kill-buyers purchase horses to sell to slaughter.

We are asking for a win-win NOT for Nevada’s wild horses go to their brutal death–to slaughter.

More wild horses are needed to stop Nevada’s mega-million dollar wildfires. According to a report by CoreLogic, U.S property exposed to wildfire is valued at $136 billion.

If some wild horses do need to be brought in then the mustangs should NEVER be sold at an auction frequented by kill-buyers but should be cared for by the State of Nevada or given to sanctuaries and rescue groups. Their lives are the responsibility of the Silver State if they are not on Federal land managed by the Bureau of Land Management. We know Nevada can do the right thing.

80% of America’s population are against horse slaughter. If Governor Sandoval wants to run for President someday, then he needs to be aware that he is smearing himself by delaying taking action to stop the sale of Nevada’s beloved wild horses to kill-buyers. His character is being measured during this time of crisis.

He has an opportunity now to make history and win the endearment of 80% of Americans nationwide.

Contact the Governor here:

Governor Sandoval
Tel: 775-684-5670
fax: 775-6845683

Emails can be sent via this link.

Send us a copy of emails you send him. Our email is

Also contact Governor Sandoval on Twitter  @GovSandoval

Here is an example of wild horses not causing damage from Barbara Warner’s comment against the Sheldon Refuge wild horse wipe out:

“The 1990-91 GAO ( Government Accounting Office) study proved that horses do not over-graze or destroy riparian areas. Sheldon is still recovering from the damage that cattle have been proven to cause. Horses have flat hooves which don’t cut into the ground and constantly move as they graze. The increased population of pronghorns proves that wild horses benefit them and no doubt many other species as well.”

Here is an excellent scientific example of wild horses as native wildlife:

Indigenous wild horse families living in peace on the Virginia Range in Nevada, January 2012. (Photo © Anne Novak, all rights reserved.)

This photo shows several Virginia Range wild horse families at ‘The Meadow’ on the outskirts of Reno.

These wild horses are loved around the world. Tourists enjoy observing them at ‘The Meadow’ and elsewhere. Eco-tourism businesses could boom taking customers on wild horse safaris. This would create jobs for Nevada.

Now the Virginia Range wild horses are being trapped, castrated and ripped apart from their families only to be sold at a series of auctions, frequented by kill-buyers in Fallon, N.V. starting September 19th, 2012 and ending around October.

As of this date, the Nevada State Department of Agriculture has trapped more than 60 indigenous wild horses–of all ages–and is planning to dispose of them by selling them at the auction frequented by kill-buyers.

Please contact Governor Sandoval and ask him to take this opportunity to make history.


Links of interest:

Governor Brian Sandoval’s website:

Governor Brian Sandoval on Twitter:

News 4 reports: Sixteen Virgina Range wild horses captured

Nevada policy change ~ sells its wild horses by the pound:

U.S. property exposed to wildfire valued at $136 billion:

2012 Nevada wildland fires:

Nevada is a fence out state: Rural Fencing Rules in Nevada |

Video of wild horses in ‘The Meadow’:



Nevada is a “fence out” state

Rural Fencing Rules in Nevada


Cross-posted from eHow
By Patricia Linn, eHow Contributor


Rural Fencing Rules in Nevada thumbnail
In Nevada, you can’t ask your neighbor to fence in his cows, you have to fence them out.

Nevada is one of many western states that are primarily comprised of “open range” land. The open range designation means that cattle, horses, sheep and other livestock are free to roam and feed over any property that is not fenced. Nevada, and other open range states, legislate “fence-out” laws that essentially say: if you don’t want other people’s livestock coming on your property, then it is your responsibility to fence your land adequately to prevent ingress. Your fencing also prevents egress for your livestock

Read more: Rural Fencing Rules in Nevada |